Robert browning

His mother was an accomplished pianist and a devout evangelical Christian. His father, who worked as a bank clerk, was also an artist, scholar, antiquarian, and collector of books and pictures. His rare book collection of more than 6, volumes included works in Greek, Hebrew, Latin, French, Italian, and Spanish. It is believed that he was already proficient at reading and writing by the age of five.

Robert browning

The River Weser, deep and wide, Washes its wall on the southern side; A pleasanter spot you never spied; But, when begins my ditty, Almost five hundred years ago, To see townsfolk suffer so From vermin, was a pity. They fought the dogs, and killed the cats, And bit the babies in the cradles, And ate the cheeses out of the vats, And licked the soup from the cook's own ladles, Split open the kegs of salted sprats, Made nests inside men's Sunday hats, And even spoiled the women's chats, By drowning their speaking In fifty different sharps and flats.

At last the people in a body To the Town Hall came flocking: You hope, because you're old and obese, To find in the furry civic robe ease?

Give your brains a racking To find the remedy we're lacking, Or, sure as fate, we'll send you packing! An hour they sate in council, At length the Mayor broke silence: It's easy to bid one rack one's brain -- I'm sure my poor head aches again I've scratched it so, and all in vain. Oh for a trap, a trap, a trap!

Anything like the sound of a rat Makes my heart go pit-a-pat! And in did come the strangest figure! His queer long coat from heel to head Was half of yellow and half of red; And he himself was tall and thin, With sharp blue eyes, each like a pin, And light loose hair, yet swarthy skin, No tuft on cheek nor beard on chin, But lips where smiles went out and in -- There was no guessing his kith and kin!

And nobody could enough admire The tall man and his quaint attire. And, "Please your honors," said he, "I'm able, By means of a secret charm, to draw All creatures living beneath the sun, That creep, or swim, or fly, or run, After me so as you never saw!

And I chiefly use my charm On creatures that do people harm, The mole, and toad, and newt, and viper; And people call me the Pied Piper. And, as for what your brain bewilders, If I can rid your town of rats Will you give me a thousand guilders?

Into the street the Piper stept, Smiling first a little smile, As if he knew what magic slept In his quiet pipe the while; Then, like a musical adept, To blow the pipe his lips he wrinkled, And green and blue his sharp eyes twinkled Like a candle flame where salt is sprinkled; And ere three shrill notes the pipe uttered, You heard as if an army muttered; And the muttering grew to a grumbling; And the grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling; And out of the houses the rats came tumbling: Great rats, small rats, lean rats, brawny rats, Brown rats, black rats, grey rats, tawny rats, Grave old plodders, gay young friskers, Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins, Cocking tails and pricking whiskers, Families by tens and dozens, Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives -- Followed the Piper for their lives.

From street to street he piped, advancing, And step for step, they followed, dancing, Until they came to the river Weser Wherein all plunged and perished -- Save one who, stout as Julius Caesar, Swam across and lived to carry As he the manuscript he cherished To Rat-land home his commentary: Which was, "At the first shrill notes of the pipe, I heard a sound as of scraping tripe, And putting apples, wondrous ripe, Into a cider press's gripe: And a moving away of pickle-tub-boards, And a leaving ajar of conserve-cupboards, And the drawing the corks of train-oil-flasks, And a breaking the hoops of butter-casks; And it seemed as if a voice Sweeter far than by harp or by psaltery Is breathed called out, Oh rats, rejoice!

The world is grown to one vast drysaltery!

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So munch on, crunch on, take your nuncheon, Breakfast, supper, dinner, luncheon! And just as a bulky sugar-puncheon, All ready staved, like a great sun shone Glorious scarce an inch before me, Just as methought it said, 'Come, bore me! Poke out the nests and block up the holes! Consult with carpenters and builders, And leave in our town not even a trace Of the rats!

The Mayor looked blue; So did the Corporation, too.Below is just a small segment of the professions we work in. Those listed are the more traditional professions we are familiar with.

The information contained herein has been compiled from our work in the field and the U.S. Department of Labor (Bureau of Labor Statistics). The above poem appears in the middle of Part I of the play Pippa vetconnexx.com stage direction preceding it is "[From without is heard the voice of PIPPA singing—".The direction immediately following is "[PIPPA passes." Because of this the poem is found in some anthologies under Pippa Passes or Pippa's vetconnexx.coml Macrone points out the irony of the young girl Pippa's choice of lyrics in his.

Although the early part of Robert Browning’s creative life was spent in comparative obscurity, he has come to be regarded as one of the most important poets of the Victorian period.

Robert browning

Born on 25 January in Alloway, Scotland, to William and Agnes Brown Burnes, Robert Burns followed his father's example by becoming a tenant farmer.

Robert Wiedeman Barrett Browning, known as Pen Browning, (9 March – 8 July ) was an English vetconnexx.com career was moderately successful, but he is better known as the son and heir of the celebrated English poets, Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, of whose manuscripts and memorabilia he built up a substantial vetconnexx.com also bought and restored the Baroque palace Ca.

The Collected Poems of Robert Browning (78 classic poems with an active table of contents) Aug 8,

Robert Barrett Browning - Wikipedia